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Will (IPA: /ˈwɪɫ/, /wəɫ/)


Will (v.)

The power of choosing; the faculty or endowment of the soul by which it is capable of choosing; the faculty or power of the mind by which we decide to do or not to do; the power or faculty of preferring or selecting one of two or more objects.

Will (v.)

The choice which is made; a determination or preference which results from the act or exercise of the power of choice; a volition.

Will (v.)

The choice or determination of one who has authority; a decree; a command; discretionary pleasure.

Will (v.)

Strong wish or inclination; desire; purpose.

Will (v.)

That which is strongly wished or desired.

Will (v.)

Arbitrary disposal; power to control, dispose, or determine.

Will (v.)

The legal declaration of a person's mind as to the manner in which he would have his property or estate disposed of after his death; the written instrument, legally executed, by which a man makes disposition of his estate, to take effect after his death; testament; devise. See the Note under Testament, 1.

Will (adv.)

To wish; to desire; to incline to have.

Will (adv.)

As an auxiliary, will is used to denote futurity dependent on the verb. Thus, in first person, "LFT I will RHT" denotes willingness, consent, promise; and when "LFT will RHT" is emphasized, it denotes determination or fixed purpose; as, I will go if you wish; I will go at all hazards. In the second and third persons, the idea of distinct volition, wish, or purpose is evanescent, and simple certainty is appropriately expressed; as, "LFT You will go, RHT" or "LFT He will go, RHT" describes a future event as a fact only. To emphasize will denotes (according to the tone or context) certain futurity or fixed determination.

Will (v. i.)

To be willing; to be inclined or disposed; to be pleased; to wish; to desire.

Will (n.)

To form a distinct volition of; to determine by an act of choice; to ordain; to decree.

Will (n.)

To enjoin or command, as that which is determined by an act of volition; to direct; to order.

Will (n.)

To give or direct the disposal of by testament; to bequeath; to devise; as, to will one's estate to a child; also, to order or direct by testament; as, he willed that his nephew should have his watch.

Will (v. i.)

To exercise an act of volition; to choose; to decide; to determine; to decree.

Will

Legal declaration by which a person names one or more persons to manage his or her estate and provides for the distribution of his property at death

Will

Faculty of the mind which intentionally selects the strongest desire from among the various desires present

Will

Concept in sociology

Will

Single by Mika Nakashima

Will

Belgian comics artist

Example Sentence (Quote)

" " and, alas ! for human nature, envy will always delight in inflicting mortification." - Ethel Churchill (or The Two Brides)

Example Sentence (Quote)

" " the last will and testament of the expiring Fatherland." - Constitution of May 3, 1791

Example Sentence (Quote)

" "the future will one day be the present and will seem as unimportant as the present does now." - W. Somerset Maugham

Example Sentence (Quote)

" "”when skies are hanged and oceans drowned, the single secret will still be man" - E. E. Cummings

Example Sentence (Quote)

" Additional P816 .229 million for the Philippine Crop Insurance Service which will now total P2 billion;" - Francis Escudero


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