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Subject (IPA: /ˈsəbdʒɪkt/, /səbˈdʒɛkt/)


Subject (a.)

Placed or situated under; lying below, or in a lower situation.

Subject (a.)

Placed under the power of another; specifically (International Law), owing allegiance to a particular sovereign or state; as, Jamaica is subject to Great Britain.

Subject (a.)

Exposed; liable; prone; disposed; as, a country subject to extreme heat; men subject to temptation.

Subject (a.)

Obedient; submissive.

Subject (a.)

That which is placed under the authority, dominion, control, or influence of something else.

Subject (a.)

Specifically: One who is under the authority of a ruler and is governed by his laws; one who owes allegiance to a sovereign or a sovereign state; as, a subject of Queen Victoria; a British subject; a subject of the United States.

Subject (a.)

That which is subjected, or submitted to, any physical operation or process; specifically (Anat.), a dead body used for the purpose of dissection.

Subject (a.)

That which is brought under thought or examination; that which is taken up for discussion, or concerning which anything is said or done.

Subject (a.)

The person who is treated of; the hero of a piece; the chief character.

Subject (a.)

That of which anything is affirmed or predicated; the theme of a proposition or discourse; that which is spoken of; as, the nominative case is the subject of the verb.

Subject (a.)

That in which any quality, attribute, or relation, whether spiritual or material, inheres, or to which any of these appertain; substance; substratum.

Subject (a.)

Hence, that substance or being which is conscious of its own operations; the mind; the thinking agent or principal; the ego. Cf. Object, n., 2.

Subject (n.)

The principal theme, or leading thought or phrase, on which a composition or a movement is based.

Subject (n.)

The incident, scene, figure, group, etc., which it is the aim of the artist to represent.

Subject (v. t.)

To bring under control, power, or dominion; to make subject; to subordinate; to subdue.

Subject (v. t.)

To expose; to make obnoxious or liable; as, credulity subjects a person to impositions.

Subject (v. t.)

To submit; to make accountable.

Subject (v. t.)

To make subservient.

Subject (v. t.)

To cause to undergo; as, to subject a substance to a white heat; to subject a person to a rigid test.

Subject

Linguistics: word or phrase which controls the verb in the clause; one of the two main constituents of a clause (the other is predicate)

Subject

Being who has a unique consciousness and/or unique personal experiences, or an entity that has a relationship with another entity that exists outside of itself

Subject

Person ruled over by another (typically used for citizens in a monarchy)

Subject

Property of an object in object-oriented programming

Subject

In library science, a property of a document

Example Sentence (Quote)

".. .the excellence of the mental entertainment consists less in the subject than in the author's skill in well dressing it up." - Henry Fielding

Example Sentence (Quote)

".. .the more a subject is understood, the more briefly it may be explained." - Thomas Jefferson

Example Sentence (Quote)

"A great challenge lies ahead in the modeling and verification of systems that are subject to timing constraints." - John A. Stankovic

Example Sentence (Quote)

"A man provided with paper, pencil, and rubber, and subject to strict discipline, is in effect a universal machine." - Alan Turing

Example Sentence (Quote)

"A riot is a spontaneous outburst. A war is subject to advance planning." - War


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